FyLez’ TOP 10 rappers (SEATTLE) – IN NO PARTICULAR ORDER –

SUNDAY TIMES

FRAMEWORK

A8YES (of 8-BLOCK)

KUT-LACE (of C.A.M.P.)

YOUNG REBEL (of RUSHCAMP ENT.)

SKUNTDUNANNA

BYRON DOUGLAS (of F.T.S.)

S.E.V. (of DYME DEF)

SPAC3MAN

RAZ SIMONE

(HONORABLE MENTION) JAMES FLAAMES, NACHO PICASSO, EIGHTY4 FLY)

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14 thoughts on “FyLez’ TOP 10 rappers (SEATTLE) – IN NO PARTICULAR ORDER –

    • he dropped a few solid lines in that track; no doubt…but nothing that would make me an INSTANT FAN if that was the first time i heard him or his music.

      $.02

      overall?

      7 / 10

  1. the track had momentum.
    that word is an intangible, yes,
    but it is my religion.

    momentum defines everything to me.
    philosophy of focault comes to mind.

    q had some illistic momentum,
    each individual line adds up to nothing on paper.
    boring, really,
    but my point is that he came with a feeling.

    whether it is a borrowed feeling or genuine is irrelevant.
    i just like the feeling him and kuddie made,
    dynamic songwriting.

    and i always hate mass market stuff, which this definitely falls in.
    so i’m with you on the seven out of ten…

    “iller” just makes me think that q-dot’s thrift shop moment might actually happen someday…

    • “my point is that he came with a feeling”

      SOMEWHAT – but it reminds me of cartoons – where the good guy never KILLS the bad guy – he just beats him up, locks him up, or makes him go away. “ILLER” didn’t have that KILL-FACTOR to it – not at all. i got the message – i understand the point – but it didn’t drive home the message because it was too P.C. (politically correct) – it’s coo though. RAW consciousness is something that Seattle rappers lack, to a point.

      RAW meaning that the SPIRIT, the ESSENCE of that individual and / or his message is UNMISTAKABLY conveyed through his delivery, lyrics, and lifestyle.

      no such thing as being a GOOD-GUY for a single or two…that’s something you gotta be BUILT out of.

  2. “ILLER” didn’t have that KILL-FACTOR to it – not at all.

    did eminem have a kill factor for you?
    i only felt it from him on a very tender few songs, the strangest of which being smack that.
    smack that is the dumbest pop song, but to me that is where em fit in the groove perfectly songcraft.

    the kill factor is a good concept…

    • i’m not a fan of the #1 BEST-SELLING RAPPER OF ALL TIME – i can’t even LISTEN to someone who’s so RIDICULOUSLY overrated

      $.02

  3. here’s my point.
    it’s possible to listen as an intellectual exercise not as a fan.

    if i only listened to rap i liked, 99 percent of this art form would escape me.
    i want to follow the wrong turns as well as the right ones.
    i listen to stuff i don’t appreciate to find where the game is going.

    and eminem is inescapable, as you yourself have often reminded.
    i don’t see him as the public face of rap,
    but he is comfortably ensconced at number one.

    so i try to find out why.
    i think the answer lies in syrupy club tracks like smack that,
    just as much as it lies in his harder, more confrontational material.

    not defending eminem, and i definitely am not rocking him on my laptop.
    just trying to figure out why he is at the top running laps…

    • “i think the answer lies in syrupy club tracks like smack that,
      just as much as it lies in his harder, more confrontational material.”

      with RACE having absolutely NOTHING to do with it, huh? LMFAO

      “just trying to figure out why he is at the top running laps…”

      the answer is black and white (pun intended? you tell me)

  4. i think i was more trying to pursue the kill factor concept a little more,
    and got it twisted because i brought up eminem.
    my bad.

    i only brought that fool up because of our earlier discussion.
    but let’s say we forget eminem.

    i think the kill factor is a valid concern.
    and your cartoon example was dead right.

    lately i don’t get a kill factor from hardly anyone.

    i love das racist and don’t talk to the cops,
    but both groups are just dancing around the bush,
    wasting time.
    being clever.

    killer mike destroyed it with his latest.
    he killed everything in his path.
    on some ice cube steroids for his tour de france…

    • “lately i don’t get a kill factor from hardly anyone.”

      i agree 100%

      today, it’s either POLITICS, RACE, and / or POPULARITY (all 3 = “POLITICALLY CORRECT MUSIC”) that’s keeping people from going their HARDEST.

      i personally don’t think ANYBODY wants “REAL” anymore; we just want TRENDY, CATCHY, POPULAR, & HOT.

  5. “but both groups are just dancing around the bush,
    wasting time.
    being clever.”

    same thing with local rappers…everybody (*HOT*) out here is just trying to appeal to the ‘masses’. it’s either some type of ‘FEEL-GOOD’ / ‘CARE-FREE’-type of music or some kind of ‘SWAG’ / ‘CLEVER WORDPLAY’- type of stuff…BOTH of which have been BEATEN TO DEATH.

    music is TIRED…or maybe, ‘HOT’ / ‘POPULAR’ Hip-Hop / Rap is tired…REGARDLESS of the HYPE behind it…this music shit is more about POPULARITY than it is ART; it’s more about PSYCHOLOGY (relatability) than it is about ORIGINALITY (creativity).

    +++…and i put that on EVERYTHING I LOVE…+++

  6. slow dance has an element of this killer instinct.
    some of the stuff on risk it all is pretty out there.
    housy.
    but i can get down with it, and i think they are coming from an exciting place.
    not truly barbaric, but they show signs they could get there.
    i like it caveman sound.

    “it’s either some type of ‘FEEL-GOOD’ / ‘CARE-FREE’-type of music or some kind of ‘SWAG’ / ‘CLEVER WORDPLAY’- type of stuff…BOTH of which have been BEATEN TO DEATH.”

    that’s why i latched on to the psycho determination in daftpunk.
    they weren’t afraid to pester the listener with a concept.
    beat it into them. track after track.
    and the distortion, accoutrements.

    that to me was harder than anything i was hearing in rap.

    there are always new directions for music, it is never a dead end.
    beleedat.

    • “that to me was harder than anything i was hearing in rap.”

      generally.

      cappadonna is dropping a new one soon…HOPEFULLY he’ll come with some KILL-FACTOR.

      …but like i already said, being RAW is a thing of the past, a FAD of the past.

      if you’re Black, you had BETTER be in a box, if you want listeners. – i think that White artists have more room to be creative – Black rap fans are too brainwashed to be receptive to anything that is forward-thinking; it’s sad.

      it’s actually kinda complex; what happened to Hip-Hop. White rappers that are half as raw as Black rappers are actually going HARDER than Black rappers – White fans being more dedicated, open-minded, and supportive of White rappers than the Black FAN / RAPPER relationship.

      i think that Black folks are too STAR-STRUCK and BRAINWASHED for us to progress this genre anymore than we already have.

      when Hip-Hop first touched down, it was labeled a FAD – then it was accepted as a CULTURE – – – …and now it’s back to FAD – – – …funny how things work.

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