J. Pinder: “Seattle has its own unique style, BUT…”

“Seattle has its own unique style, but there are other styles that get overlooked.”

I’m about to translate what that statement REALLY means…we have to always remember that a lot can be said in a few words…

let’s get started, shall we?

“Seattle, as far as the hiphop scene goes— and I know a lot of people who disagree with me—is not the place for the things I want to accomplish,” explains Pinder over the phone. “It is definitely a hard place to do certain styles of music. Seattle has its own unique style, but there are other styles that get overlooked. Sometimes, when you create the music I create, it may not be the best thing for Seattle as a whole.”

“Also,” he says a little later on, “I wanted to be closer to the people I’m working with, like Kuddie Fresh, who recently moved here from Seattle. And there are others—Tha Bizness and the Parker Brothaz are in Atlanta now. And, you know, it’s just a different energy from Seattle.”

Charles Mudede: “J.Pinder up and left town for Atlanta—Seattle’s opposite in every way: a black city…”

LOOK…my point is this: it’s NO SECRET THAT SEATTLE IS A “WHITE” CITY AND ATLANTA IS A “BLACK” CITY…

why is that important?

it’s important because IN MY OPINION, WHITE PEOPLE “FEEL” OTHER WHITE PEOPLE’S MUSIC MORE THAN THEY “FEEL” BLACK PEOPLE’S MUSIC.

and what does that mean for black artists in a white city?

that means that they gotta go where they are “wanted”…go where people can actually understand them…”relate” better to them; and last but definitely not least, FINANCIALLY “support” them.

MY FINAL VERDICT?

THE SEATTLE HIP HOP / RAP “SCENE” WILL NOT AND CAN  NOT “FLOURISH” LIKE THAT OF L.A., ATL, and / or N.Y. because RACIALLY, whites are more inclined to “support” their own artists…and since Seattle is NOT a “black” city, the scene is “doomed” because a black artist will never be FINANCIALLY SUPPORTED more than a white artist (even if the black artist is “better” <more talented>) in a city that’s “majority” is white.

(meaning that a black artist will never have the market “cornered” out here in order to be taken seriously by the “industry” as a whole. Seattle would rather give that position to an artist that is LESS TALENTED <by black standards> but WHITE, or non-black)

my advice to black artists???

BE CLEAR on the fact that in a white-majority city, THEY AIN’T GONNA BE FEELIN’ YOU LIKE THAT…and your pockets (accounts receivable) (in relation to your skill / talent level) will stand as  immediate and irrefutable proof.

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7 thoughts on “J. Pinder: “Seattle has its own unique style, BUT…”

  1. it is good to read this piece.
    it explains many of the other posts on this blog.

    like a rosetta stone.

    thank you for sharing your ideas, most people are not brave enough to do that.

    i think there are two pieces that fit together here.

    1)

    “it’s important because IN MY OPINION, WHITE PEOPLE “FEEL” OTHER WHITE PEOPLE’S MUSIC MORE THAN THEY “FEEL” BLACK PEOPLE’S MUSIC.”

    i see it differently having felt most connected to black artists for many years.
    the theory that hip hop in the 80’s satisfied a voyeuristic fantasy for white people in the suburbs to see what was happening in the hood has basically been upheld.
    only one problem, now the hood being sold to kids is an imaginary one with diamond grillz and 72″ rims.
    but even as a teenage voyeur, i felt so connected to the messages i was hearing from krs public enemy etc.

    2)

    THE SEATTLE HIP HOP / RAP “SCENE” WILL NOT AND CAN NOT “FLOURISH” LIKE THAT OF L.A., ATL, and / or N.Y. because RACIALLY, whites are more inclined to “support” their own artists…and since Seattle is NOT a “black” city, the scene is “doomed” because a black artist will never be FINANCIALLY SUPPORTED more than a white artist (even if the black artist is “better” ) in a city that’s “majority” is white.

    this one has a lot more to unpack.
    first of all, talent is a fluid term, that is judged by different audiences.
    but i refuse to accept your premise that the majority white hip hop fanbase in seattle would not come together around the right artist regardless of race.
    i’m not singing kumbaya, just sayin.

    clowning that top ten list was fun, yes.
    but if the right artist came along that had it, then blammo.

    look at reggie watts.
    what if he had decided to be a rapper instead of an x-rated weird al yankovic?
    he’d be huge…

    • “i see it differently having felt most connected to black artists for many years.”

      which i APPRECIATE – but we’re not talking about EXCEPTIONS – we’re discussing NUMBERS – POPULATIONS – DEMOGRAPHICS; and the repercussions those elements have on HIP-HOP / Rap music as a WHOLE with a FOCUS on LOCAL ‘URBAN’ (Black) music.

  2. “i refuse to accept your premise that the majority white hip hop fanbase in seattle would not come together around the right artist regardless of race.”

    who’s the hottest local / Seattle rapper RIGHT NOW? MACKLEMORE – NO QUESTION. and why is that? you can ask him TODAY if he thinks he’s the BEST or MOST TALENTED in Seattle – and you know what? he’ll tell you STRAIGHT UP that he’s NOT the best.

    DEMOGRAPHICS ‘DEFAULT’ to him being the BEST – 100% RACE / RELATABILITY issue here.

    but since you’re on one side and i’m on the other, we both INHERENTLY disagree with each other.

    agreeing to disagree is what gentlemen do; – but the NUMBERS tell quite the different tale –

  3. in the years i was most deeply affected by hip hop, there were no white artists.
    beastie boys: great musicians, not rappers.
    3rd bass: they always felt like a gimmick act to me.
    house of pain: like a car alarm going off at night

    atmosphere and eminem were still coming up, not really confident yet.

    so if you listened to rap, it meant the musicians were african american…

    period.

    in 2012 that seems impossible, crazy boundaries have been broken.
    rap is so much more melting pot than in 1988 or 1989.

    so these categories of race and culture are shifting like focault’s model.
    and faster than we might expect.

    i see how kids growing up in today’s music climate could be more likely to gravitate toward hip hop from members of their own ethnic or social group. I see what you’re getting at
    look at the fucking juggalos.
    a magnet for that personality.

    back in the day, exclusively black.

    • “i see how kids growing up in today’s music climate could be more likely to gravitate toward hip hop from members of their own ethnic or social group”

      RIGHT.

      so let’s not act like being a white artist these days is more of a LIABILITY than an ASSET.

      it’s more about RACE, ‘LIKABILITY’, and RELATABILITY (which white HIP-HOP / RAP artists currently enjoy and profit from) than it is about SKILLS, CREATIVITY, and ARTISTRY (which black HIP-HOP / RAP artists used to hold in the utmost esteem). – – – and that’s just scratching the SURFACE.

      NOW you can be a black artist and have oodles of skills, creativity, and artistry and go virtually UNNOTICED due to the white artists RACE, LIKABILITY, and RELATABILITY.

      the old saying goes:

      if you’re white, you’re alright
      if you’re brown, stick around
      if you’re black, get back

      …i didn’t know that applied to MUSIC until i actually got involved in the industry…so it’s kinda like an INSIDER’S BEST KEPT SECRET –

      Sincerely,

      FyLe ForMatz

  4. it’s more about RACE, ‘LIKABILITY’, and RELATABILITY (which white HIP-HOP / RAP artists currently enjoy and profit from) than it is about SKILLS, CREATIVITY, and ARTISTRY (which black HIP-HOP / RAP artists used to hold in the utmost esteem). – – – and that’s just scratching the SURFACE.

    NOW you can be a black artist and have oodles of skills, creativity, and artistry and go virtually UNNOTICED due to the white artists RACE, LIKABILITY, and RELATABILITY.

    what about the intangibles?
    it’s not as if hip hop has clearly defined boundaries that people could just sleepwalk through them.
    there are no boundaries.
    just like with production.

    there was a good post here about producers barely scratching the surface in terms of soundscapes.
    well, what about the intangibles: namely passion.

    maybe mack has more passion than some of these calculating cats.
    black artists need passion too.

    as i said,
    the top ten was milktoast.

    it there were a black artist in seattle with what is here termed as passion, then you would see it.
    now this ain’t a lazy thing.
    it’s not a stereotype.

    more like casinos.

    you bet on red, then red, then black.
    and maybe black wins.

  5. DEMOGRAPHICS ‘DEFAULT’ to him being the BEST – 100% RACE / RELATABILITY issue here.

    now this is easy low hanging fruit here, but there is no way it is one hundred percent of his success.
    no way.
    that’s just anodyne.
    as though he just needs to show up at the stadium and perform.
    so easy.
    jeez.

    mack did not just get shoved to the front on a conveyor belt because he was not black.
    that is fever swamp talk.

    mack is a driven muthafucka.
    we’ve seen it.

    and drive counts as much or more than talent.

    real talk.

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